This Makeup Brand Hired Customers to Star in Its Ads, and the Results Are Beautiful

#MyFaceMyRules

This Makeup Brand Hired Customers to Star in Its Ads, and the Results Are Beautiful

(Photo by Sleek MakeUP/Instagram)

U.K.-based cosmetics brand Sleek MakeUP knows all about makeup-shaming. Actually, you know makeup-shaming, too, even if you haven’t heard the phrase before.

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It’s the way you feel when someone shoots you side eye for wearing a killer cat eye to school, or makes a judge-y comment about your neon eyeshadow, or rolls their eyes at your Instagrammable eyebrows on a regular Wednesday. Basically, it’s the feeling of being judged for wearing makeup that’s consider too ~extra~ for an average day (as if it’s anyone else’s business).

Sleek MakeUP has responded to this cultural phenomenon with a new campaign, #MyFaceMyRules, that truly celebrates everyone’s right to wear whatever kind of makeup they darn well please.

To really drive the point home, Sleek MakeUP cast real customers in its ad campaign instead of models, and all we can say is yes to everything about that.

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The people featured in the ad represent the diversity of makeup lovers (and, let’s be honest — it’s a way more diverse group of humans than most makeup ads would have us believe). We’re talking not just a range of ethnicities, but also genders, sexualities, body types, and ages.

It’s representative in a way we’re not used to seeing in beauty media, and we love Sleek MakeUP for portraying makeup enthusiasts with such honesty and authenticity.

If you’re thinking, “makeup-shaming isn’t really a thing,” then just consider yourself lucky you’ve never experienced it. According to a new survey conducted by Sleek MakeUP and anti-bullying charity Ditch the Label, one in three people have felt judged for the makeup they wear.

This can mean feeling the judgmental glare of people who don’t appreciate your YouTube guru aesthetic, but it also applies to groups that are judged even more harshly for expressing themselves with cosmetics, such as men, older women, mothers who feel pressured to look “mature,” members of the LGBTQ+ community, and people of color.

Feeling judged for the makeup you wear isn’t just some trivial issue for teenage girls (and, honestly, even if teenage girls were the only group affected by it, that still wouldn’t make it trivial). It’s a real issue impacting a wide range of people around the world.

Kayleigh Roberts
Kayleigh Roberts

Kayleigh Roberts is a writer and editor living in Los Angeles. She really identifies with Leslie Knope, especially on the issue of salad. http://www.kayleighroberts.com [twitter:kayleighroberts]